All About Jazz-NewYork review by Clifford Allen


Adam Lane’s Full Throttle Orchestra – Ashcan Rantings (CF 203)
Bassist Adam Lane began his Full Throttle Orchestra while still calling the West Coast home, as an environment that could bring together his interests in jazz and new music with a punkish energy. Though the term “orchestra” in a traditional sense might be a stretch for this outfit, orchestration – or sound organization based upon internal relationships – is not foreign to Lane’s concepts as a bandleader/composer. Ashcan Rantings is the third Full Throttle disc, and second for Clean Feed Records, and is organized around a decidedly East Coast nexus – trumpeters NateWooley and Taylor Ho Bynum, trombonists Reut Regev and Tim Vaughn, reedmen Avram Fefer, MattBauder and David Bindman and drummer Igal Foni on two discs’ worth of original material. While Lane’s work is certainly informed by tensions and differences, he also gives it a swinging shove, quickly evident following the lush, brass and reed opening to “Imaginary Portrait”. Supple bass and drum lines propel a decidedly buoyant series of loose knots, out of which Regev’s peppery brass sinews emerge. This contrast is further espoused by Wooley’s solo, which moves from crackly feeding-back to Lester Bowie-like bravura and back. “Marshall” deftly plots an Eastern European slink, broad ensemble strokes that remain both weighty and airy, in perfect counterpoint to the clambering openness of DavidBindman’s (Brooklyn Sax Quartet, et al.) tenor and the fluttering delicacy of a duet between Regev and Foni (underpinned by bass, but still a duo). The title track begins with a horsehair-grinding arco solo from the leader and moves into the sort of sludgy rock rhythms (cue distortion) that have occasionally popped up on some of Lane’s other compositions. It’s quite effective when the bassist couples electronic fuzz with Bauder’s splattering baritone work (Surman-like on the gorgeous “Bright Star Calypso”) and the noise buriesthe ensemble vocalizations in a curious textural stew, which is not without buoyancy. A group is only as compelling as its parts and Lane has both clear respect for and interest in the players, giving them space to do what they do.

+ There are no comments

Add yours