Paris Transatlantic review by Stephen Griffith


Adam Lane’s Full Throttle Orchestra – ASHCAN RANTINGS (CF 203)
What’s different about this two-disc set that should attract more attention than the previous two largely ignored offerings by this nonet version of Adam Lane’s “orchestra”? Maybe the presence of household names (at least in the miniscule number of households that listen to this music) like reedist Avram Fefer and trumpeters Nate Wooley and Taylor Ho Bynum. Maybe the lack of skronky electric guitars that bolstered the overt Motörhead influences that sent purists scurrying to the safety of their Ken Burns sets (although once the leader has lulled them into complacent acceptance with the lush arrangements on the first disc, he breaks out his fuzzbox midway through the title cut on the second). Or maybe it’s the haunting sense of familiarity of the excellent original compositions, two of which were featured on a prior quartet date Four Corners. Whatever the reason, it deserves your attention.
The Mingus influence was clear in the first recorded incarnation of the group, No(w) Music on Cadence Jazz Records, but, despite the lack of a piano, never has it been more evident than here, whether in the prominent placement of Lane’s bass in the mix or his pugnacious squaring-off with soloists throughout. But the influences are significantly more varied: the opening arrangement of “Imaginary Portrait” recalls the more recent David Murray Octet, and “Desperate Incantations” begins with a South African lilt before Lane prods the duelling trumpets of Wooley and Ho Bynum into a frenzy. “Nine Man Morris” sounds like a large group arrangement of an early Braxton fractured motif until Lane slows things down for a Tim Vaughn trombone feature. Top drawer stuff.
http://www.paristransatlantic.com/magazine/monthly2010/12dec_text.html#8

+ There are no comments

Add yours